Wednesday, 28 February 2018

Professor Margaret Kyle on Whether Pharmaceutical Innovations are Rewarded

Our friends at Oxfirst are hosting another interesting webinar on March 14, 2018 at 15.00 BST and 16.00 CET.  The webinar is titled, “Are Important Innovations Rewarded?  Evidence from Pharmaceutical Markets.”  The presenter is Professor Margaret Kyle. 

Here is a description of the presentation:

This research focuses on the relationship between therapeutic value and different measures of market rewards (the number of patents, price, market share, and total revenues) of a new treatment. Using an assessment of therapeutic value provided by the French Haute Authorité de Santé (HAS), I find a weak relationship between most measures of rewards and this assessment of therapeutic value, suggesting that the returns to developing a “me-too” product are not very different from developing treatments with greater therapeutic effects. One interpretation is that the HAS score is a poor assessment of therapeutic value, in which case the use of similar health technology assessments by governments and other payers should be re-examined. Alternatively, if the HAS score is informative, the results suggest countries are spending too much on less innovative products, and that a re-balancing of innovation incentives may be worth considering if therapeutic value is highly related to social welfare.

Here is Professor Kyle’s biography:

Prof. Margaret Kyle (MINES ParisTech and CEPR) currently holds the Chair in Intellectual Property and Markets for Technology at MINES ParisTech. Her research concerns innovation, productivity and competition. She has a number of papers examining R&D productivity in the pharmaceutical industry, specifically the role of geographic and academic spillovers; the firm-specific and policy determinants of the diffusion of new products; generic competition; and the use of markets for technology. Recent work examines the effect of trade and IP policies on the level, location and direction of R&D investment and competition. She also works on issues of innovation and access to therapies in developing countries. Her papers have been published in various journals of economics, strategy, and health policy, including the RAND Journal of Economics, Journal of Public Economics, Review of Economics and Statistics, Journal of Public Economics, Journal of Law and Economics, Antitrust Law Journal, Management Science, and Health Affairs.

Margaret holds a PhD in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and is an associate editor of the International Journal of Industrial Organization. She previously held positions at Carnegie Mellon University, Duke University, London Business School, and the Toulouse School of Economics, and is a visiting professor at the Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University. She has also been a visiting scholar at the Center for the Study of Innovation and Productivity at the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco and at the University of Hong Kong.
Registration is available, here.  Space is limited and you must register with a professional email address.

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